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Latissimus dorsi stretch

What is latissimus dorsi stretch?

  • Latissimus dorsi stretch is an important exercise to increase the flexibility of the upper body, If the patient is performing the exercise helps to decrease the risk of injury & also improves the fitness level.
  • A latissimus dorsi is one of the biggest muscles in the back. This is sometimes known as the lats & which has a large, flat “V” shape. This reaches the width of the back & helps control the motion of the shoulders.
  • When the latissimus dorsi muscle is injured, the patient might feel the ache in the low back, mid-to-upper back, along the bottom of the scapula, or in the back of the shoulder. The patient may even feel pain on the inside of the arm, all the way up to the fingers.
  • Stretching of lats is very important for the back due to this gives strength to the back. It is important for posture also.

What are the advantages of performing latissimus dorsi stretch?

There are some benefits you may achieve by stretching, these are:

  • This helps stabilize the spine.
  • It also assists with shoulder & arm motion.
  • Helps to relieve Latissimus dorsi muscle pain, spasms, and cramps
  • This supports good posture.
  • This is essential for building upper-body strength.
  • Increase range of motion that also slows the degeneration of the joints.
  • This prevents injury.
  • reduces muscle tightness as well as stiffness.
  • This decrease the risk of injury.
  • It helps to relieve post-exercise aches as well as pains.
  • Stretching may also decrease muscular tension as well as increase muscular relaxation.
  • Increase mechanical efficiency & overall functional performance.
  • Stretching before the exercise allows the muscles to loosen up & able to give the impact of the activity you choose to perform.
  • Stretching promotes circulation at the sides of the body.

What are the types of latissimus dorsi stretching?

There are so many techniques for performing latissimus dorsi stretching:

  • Latissimus dorsi stretch
  • Elbow Pull
  • Side Lie On Exercise Ball
  • Latissimus Stretch Whilst Sitting
  • Door Frame Lean
  • Side Bend With Resistance Band
  • Side Lie Stretch
  • Hanging Latissimus Stretches
  • Eccentric Loading Of The Latissimus Dorsi
  • Performing a Pelvic tilt
  • Active floor stretch
  • Foam rolling
  • Exercise ball stretch
  • Wall press
  • Upward Salute
  • Cat-Cow pose
  • Downward-Facing Dog
  • Child’s Pose.

Latissimus dorsi stretch

  • How to perform this stretching: Stand straight. The back is straight & the hands are straight above the head.
  • Slowly lean towards either of the sides.
  • The patient feels the stretch on the opposite side.
  • Hold for 8-10 seconds & repeat 6-8 times.
Latissimus dorsi stretch
Latissimus dorsi stretch

Elbow Pull

  • How to do this stretching: Move the right hand down towards the middle back part.
  • Place the left hand onto the right elbow that is moving down the back.
  • Pull the right elbow towards a midline.
  • Tilt the upper body towards the side.
  • When the patient feels stretched, hold there for 20 seconds.
Elbow Pull
Elbow Pull

Side Lie On Exercise Ball

  • How to do this exercise: Lie on the left side of the exercise ball.
  • Maintain the feet’ position near a ball to maintain balance.
  • Reach over with the right arm.
  • The patient feels the stretch on the right side.
  • Hold it for 30 seconds & repeat on the left side.
Side Lie On Exercise Ball
Side Lie On Exercise Ball

Latissimus dorsi Stretch Whilst Sitting

  • How to do this stretching: Take the sitting position on the chair with the table in front of you.
  • Pot both elbows aiming forwards onto the border of a table.
  • Draw the hips backward from a table.
  • Allow the chest to let fall.
  • The patient feels the stretch on both sides, hold for 25-30 seconds.
Latissimus dorsi Stretch Whilst Sitting
Latissimus dorsi Stretch Whilst Sitting

Door Frame Lean

  • How to do this stretching: Stand on the side of the door frame, so the body parallels the door.
  • Now hold the door frame with the opposite side of the hand from the door.
  • Now bend towards the side of the door frame at the waist level.
  • Use the weight to sink into a stretch.
  • Twist your pelvis opposite side.
  • You feel a stretch on the side of your upper body.
  • Hold it for 20-30 seconds and repeat it 2-3 times.
Door Frame Lean
Door Frame Lean

Side Bend With Resistance Band

  • How to do this exercise: Stand tall sideways of a static object where you have to tie up the resistance band above the head level.
  • Hold the band with the opposite side of the hand.
  • Step away from the object until you create tension in a band.
  • Relax the arm so the body weight sinks onto a resistance band.
  • The most body weight is onto the leg that is far away from the band.
  • Twist a pelvis away.
  • The patient bends at the waist level as you feel the stretch.
  • Hold this for 30 seconds and release.
Side Bend With Resistance Band
Side Bend With Resistance Band

Side Lie Stretch

  • How to do this stretch: Take the side-lying position on either side.
  • Put the lower elbow on the couch.
  • Move the body to sink toward the ground.
  • Stretch the lower leg away from the body.
  • Hold there for 30 seconds as well as release.
Side Lie Stretch
Side Lie Stretch

Hanging Latissimus Stretches

  • How to do this stretch: Stand tall under the bar that is above the head level.
  • Grasp the band with both hands as well as hang on.
  • Relax the body to feel the stretch.
  • Maintain the feet to lightly rest on the floor.
  • Hold this for 25-30 seconds.
  • To feel a deep stretch you can apply weight onto the ankle.
Hanging Latissimus Stretches
Hanging Latissimus Stretches

Eccentric Loading Of The Latissimus Dorsi

  • This includes creating muscular contraction while the muscle is lengthening. It will stretch the Latissimus Dorsi.
  • How to do this stretch: Take the lying position on a floor with the knees bent.
  • Maintain the lower back fully flat on the floor throughout the exercise.
  • Hold a weight with both hands.
  • Gently lower the weight downward above the head level without moving the lower back to the arch.
  • The patient can feel the stretch at the end of a motion.
  • Hold for 15 seconds and repeat 7-8 times.

Performing a Pelvic tilt

Performing a Pelvic tilt
Performing a Pelvic tilt
  • How to do this exercise: Lie down on the floor.
  • Gently bend both knees as well as slide them towards the body.
  • The feet should be touching the floor.
  • The hands at either side.
  • Now lift the waist/pelvic or midsection of the body upwards towards the roof.
  • Keep the feet touching the ground.
  • When you feel the stretch at the sides of a body stop there.
  • Keep that position and hold it for 5-10 seconds.
  • Then lower down the waist & do it again.
  • The patient can increase a hold time after some time when you feel comfortable in 5-10 seconds holding time.

Active floor stretch

  • How to do this stretching: Take the kneeling position.
  • Put the left forearm along the floor.
  • Learn the weight onto the left arm & stretch out the right arm.
  • The patient feels a stretch on the right side.
  • Hold it for 20 seconds and repeat.
Active floor stretch
Active floor stretch

Foam rolling

  • How to do this stretching: Lie down on the floor.
  • Gently bend both knees & slide them towards the body.
  • The feet should be touching the floor.
  • The hands at either side.
  • Now lift the waist/pelvic or midsection of the body upwards towards the roof.
  • Keep the feet touching the floor.
  • When the patient feels a stretch at the sides of the body stop there.
  • keep this position & hold it for 5-10 seconds.
  • Then lower down the waist & do it again.
  • The patient can increase a hold time after some time when you feel comfortable in 5-10 seconds holding time.
Foam rolling
Foam rolling

Wall press

  • How to do this stretch: The patient can stand in front of the wall 2 feet away, facing towards the wall.
  • Place the palms flat, touching the wall.
  • Bent forward at the waist & forward the weight onto the palms
  • The patient feels stretched on the sides, hold for around 1 minute.
  • Release and repeat 2 times.
Wall press
Wall press

Upward Salute

  • How to do this stretching: Stand tall with the arms on either side.
  • The feet are slightly apart from each other & the body weight is evenly distributed on both feet.
  • Raise both arms upwards towards the roof.
  • Engage the core muscles & keep the spine straight.
  • Slightly bend backward to feel more stretched.
  • Hold for 20 seconds and release.
Upward Salute
Upward Salute

Downward-Facing Dog

  • How to do this stretching: Start on all fours with the wrists & the shoulders in the same line as well as the knees below the hips.
  • Tuck the toes under & raise the hips off the floor.
  • Straighten the legs & draw the heels toward the floor(they do not have to be on the ground). If the hamstrings are tight, then slightly bent the knees.
  • Push firmly through the palms & focus on widening across the clavicles as well as the shoulders. Move the chin to tuck into the chest.
  • The patient feels stretched at the sides of the body. Hold there for 20 seconds.
Downward-Facing Dog yoga
Downward-Facing Dog

Child’s Pose

  • How to do this stretching: Take the kneel-sitting position on the ground.
  • Now bend at the waist as well as straighten the arms forward to touch the ground.
  • Reach the hands forward as far as possible to feel stretched on the sides of the body.
  • Keep the knees & heels in a position while they stretch.
  • Breath normally. When the patient feels stretched, take a 20-30 seconds hold.
  • Repeat 2-3 times.
Child’s Pose
Child’s Pose

What are the safety as well as precautions of latissimus dorsi stretching?

There are some precautions the patient needs to take care of while stretching:

  • Do not bounce. Stretch in a smooth motion, without bouncing. Bouncing while a stretch can injure the muscle & cause muscle tightness.
  • Hold the stretch. Breathe normally & hold every stretch for around 20- 30 seconds.
  • Never aim for pain. Expect to feel tension while you were stretching, not pain. If the patient feels pain, stop right there and do not push hard.
  • Keep up with the stretching. This can be time-consuming. But the patient can reach the most advantages by stretching daily, at least 2-3 times a week.
  • If the patient has a prior condition or an injury, the patient needs to adjust the stretching techniques. Consult the physical therapist if you have a problem.
  • Remember that stretching also makes you injured. Stretching will not prevent an overuse injury.

FAQ

  1. What causes tight latissimus dorsi?

    How the lats get tight: poor posture (sitting or even driving a lot) going too hard at a gym e.g. lat pull-down machine, chin-ups. Over many years of swimming, pulling through water in freestyle.

  2. What does the strained latissimus dorsi feel like?

    When the latissimus dorsi is injured, the patient might feel pain in the low back, mid-to-upper back, along the base of the scapula, or in the back of the shoulder. The patient may even feel pain along the inside of an arm, all the way down to the fingers.

  3. How long does the strained lat take to heal?

    Recovery time varies depending on the strain, with Grade 1 strains typically requiring 2-3 weeks as well as Grade 2 strains usually taking at least a month. Grade 3 strains often require surgery, however, & can come with considerably longer recovery periods.

  4. Can the torn lat heal on its own?

    Latissimus dorsi ruptures are treatable. Significant or even full tears do not heal on their own, & may be treated with or without surgery.Sports as well as higher-level activity may usually be resumed six to nine months after surgery.

  5. Are lats connected to hips?

    The latissimus dorsi is a large, flat muscle covering the width of the middle and lower back. It connects the bone of the upper arm to the spine and the hip. This muscle is often referred to as the lats.

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